To address vandalism, homeless encampments, illegal dumping and vagrancy issues at Highland Community Park, Highland City Council approved on Tuesday, June 8, the construction of iron fences and a metal trash enclosure at the park at a total cost of $52,230.

The park, at the southeast corner of Central Avenue and Hibiscus Street, is the location of Little League baseball facilities, Highland YMCA and Sam J. Racadio Highland Library and Environmental Learning Center.

According to a city staff report, the park has had ongoing issues with vandalism, homeless encampment and dumping at the park and surrounding the YMCA and library buildings. One additional problem has been keeping people from digging through the YMCA and library dumpsters and dumping the trash out in the drive lane as they search for recyclables.

To solve these problems and secure the park during hours of closure, 10 p.m. to 6 a.m., the city plans to build 182 feet of 7-foot tall wrought iron fence along Lillian Lane to cut off access to the east end of the park from the City Creek wash, 70 feet of wrought iron fencing to secure the rear exit ramp of the YMCA building and sheet metal roof enclosures for the YMCA and library trash enclosures.

Each of these items was treated as a separate project when the city requested informal bids from six contractors.

The Lillian Lane fence will be constructed by CWFC Inc. for a contract of $12,980, the exit ramp fence by UC Fence for $10,400 and the trash enclosures will be installed by Diamond Sheet Metal for $28,850.

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