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Last year, 2016, was bookended by two devastating losses.  The first was the loss of the old True/Rohrer building, the old post office building, recently known as Murad’s, and the Nathan L. Brown hardware store, that some may have known as Cromwells.

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Today’s story involves Reuben Francis Cunningham, an enterprising man vastly involved in the communities of San Bernardino, Highland, Riverside, and beyond.

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The 2016 Presidential Election is over. While winning the popular vote, Hillary Clinton was unable to break through that “highest glass ceiling” in the electoral college tally.

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Santa Claus, Inc. had a double celebration on Saturday, Oct. 29, with gifts for every child who registered for the early Christmas kickoff for the organization, which now serves families year-round.

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Politics are not a favorite subject, however, it is election time again, and it could be said that the presidential campaigns have been somewhat controversial. But, there were three highly controversial elections that we will review today.

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Several years ago a series of articles addressed the changes which occurred over time on the four corners of Palm Ave. and Base Line.

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On the north-west corner of Base Line and Central Avenue stands a building with a varied history. Some of you will remember it as the old feed store.

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On occasion, the Historical Society is to review a proposed site for its historical impact as part of the Section 106 review process.

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The future is now at East Valley Water District (EVWD) where the Board of Directors has approved a $2 million contract for new “smart meters” that will monitor water use at every connection, sharing that information with the water district as well as the customer.

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The San Bernardino Republican Women Federated enjoyed a fashion show and was encouraged to take an increasingly active role in local government and elections during its 2016 Fashion Show luncheon Saturday, May 21, at Shandin Hills Golf Club in San Bernardino.

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Over the past many years, we have learned about the many edibles grown in this area. We know that before oranges and lemons there were deciduous fruits such as apricots and peaches and grapes. There was Hamamura's strawberry field, which was previously Wissler's potato farm. Where the writer…

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In 1891, a railroad depot was established at Palm and Pacific avenues. Of course, that the railroad was coming was no surprise. So, enterprising men began to lay out a townsite to be near the depot. The Town Company was started by a group of investors: A.M. Kensington, L.C. Waite, T.S. Ingha…

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If you should visit the San Manuel Casino, the elevator ride to the casino floor will reveal a bit of history. As you look out the windows you will see the former York house which is now used for offices.

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A native of Norwich, Ohio, Alfred Marcy Aplin was born on Oct. 14, 1837 to Benjamin and Esther Marcy Aplin. Between 1865 and 1870 the family lived in Scott County, Iowa, then moved to Chetopah, Kansas, where Mr. Aplin went into the stock business.

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Over the last few weeks we have learned about the Highland newspaper, from its beginnings as the Citrus Belt by Owner J.M. Martin, to its transformation to the Highland Messenger by Opie Warner and Edward Wall.

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Last time we reviewed the history of Highland's first newspaper, the Highland Citrus Belt. Established by J.M. Martin, the first edition was published on Oct. 6, 1892.

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The source of today’s photo is lost to memory, however, it may have been among Mrs. Rule’s collections.

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At our last Historical Society meeting, we were delighted with "Christmas Vignettes" by Larry Burgess, starting with a 1775 Christmas story of the Anza party and including a story about Fred Brown's horse Doll wearing snowshoes, it ended about 1899 with a short recounting of the Christmas ea…

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Standing at 3297 Highland Ave. on the corner of Pepper Street stands the Highland House of Flowers.

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Last week we learned about the Baake Chicken Ranch at the north end of Browning Road. This was to have evolved into a story about the Turkey ranch that some will still remember. However, information was lacking at the time.

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Thanksgiving is upon us again. Rather than repeat the history of the holiday, we will focus our attention on the turkey … or what eventually became the turkey ranch in East Highlands.

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The question has been asked, “How do you find things to write about?” With that question in mind, today’s story will lead the reader through the convoluted mental meanderings of the writer.

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Last week we left our story of Highland’s beauty shop with the purchase by Ruth Briggs of the business from Ladona Hagy. The building, however, owned by the Hagys was not part of the transaction.

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In last week’s story of L.S. Roney we introduced Jimmy Longmire. Today, the focus will be on Jimmy and subsequent owners of the Highland Barber Shop.

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Jimmy Longmire may be the best known Highland barber due to his 47 years in the business and because photos of Jimmy and his shop can be seen in “A Pictorial History of Highland.”

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Two projects have resulted in today’s story. The first was the transcription of Kay Beattie’s “A Look Back” columns of 1997 for Volume III of the same name.

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It was amazing that an article appeared in the Highland Community News about the 125th anniversary of the Redlands Unified School District, just as I was researching area high schools. So, today we will look at the local history of education after grammar school which went to eighth grade.

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While transcribing Kay Beattie’s columns for Vol. III of A Look Back, I came across some interesting information, that could be expanded and shared with you today.

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Last week we left off in 1892, with C.M. Hill’s new brick blacksmith shop in Messina, and the start of some competition with the construction by Will Jones of a blacksmith and carpenter shop on Linville Avenue (Pacific Avenue) “next to the meat market.”

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I say “blacksmith” and you say “horseshoes.” That is the picture that many have of the blacksmith shop. But, this craftsman is capable of much more than that.

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Last week we traced the history of the Highland Livery from the 1897 to 1907 when Charles Longmire sold the lots which included his home and business to his father, Rufus Longmire, and the livery business to A.A. “Mack” Johnson, “an experienced liveryman.”

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The first Highland Livery building was erected in 1897 by Rufus Longmire, a native of Tennessee, who came to California about 1884. Rufus took advantage of the many opportunities to prosper, of which his brother had told him, investing in a nursery and citrus business, ownership of stores on…

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The historic Cadwallader, Cram, Browning house at 29411 Base Line, is to be put up for sale by current owner Katherine Monte and there is a possibility of the property being purchased by a developer who wishes to purchase all nearby parcels, tear down and build new tract homes. An option is …

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What could be better in the hot summer months than a trip to the mountains to escape the heat and the hustle and bustle of everyday life, perhaps fishing in a stream or lake? Early Highlanders found relief from the valley heat by camping at Fredalba in what used to be the Brookings Lumber ca…

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Conversation has started up again about the historic house on Boulder Avenue across from Carl's Jr. I believe the house has historic value and should be preserved in situ as offices, a home for the Chamber, a museum … or be moved to another site. I'm sure something could be worked out, becau…

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Today, summer may mean a long family vacation or just weekend fun nearby. It was the same 100 years ago. Many spent the summer in the mountains, usually Fredlaba, or at the seaside in a summer cottage. Reports of people’s whereabouts during the summer were listed in the newspaper, the Highla…

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In 1915 the citrus industry was going strong in the Highland area. Postcards were prevalent depicting endless rows of citrus trees covered in brilliant orange fruit. Usually there was also a fresh-faced girl, in the full bloom of her youth, holding and offering one of these perfect fruits fu…

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The Highland townsite was established in 1891 with the coming of the railroad and the building of a depot at the northeast corner of what is now Palm and Pacific avenues.

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The inspiration for today’s story came in the form of an invitation to my 50th (!) high school reunion. So, today we will revisit the history of Pacific High School. But first, let’s go back to the early grammar schools and high schools.

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For reasons that are not important now, I have had in my bedroom the Historical Society's large display board of the Kite track. I am sure you have seen it as many people have used it or a similar graphic in their books and presentations.

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Sorry for the pause in our story line, but illness prevented last week’s article. To recap, the last article was about the Greek Orthodox Monastery at 27370 E. Main St., to be followed up by information on a previous owner who was an important part of the “fabric of our lives.”